Sunday, August 27, 2017

Episode 1: Is Hell Real? (And could a loving God really send people there?)

Each week, Rob and Dan take on a tough question of faith, and this week it's all about Hell. Thanks for checking out the very first episode of "Questioning Christianity."
Questioning Christianity Podcast

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8 comments:

  1. People, God does not want us in hell!
    Scripture says- "The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance".
    2 Peter 3:9 KJV

    Now, does that scripture say God sends people to hell?

    I once heard... "The BIBLE is God's LOVE LETTER to His children".
    We all have the opportunity to be grafted in God's family.

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    1. I believe that you're right about the Bible being God's love letter to us. The Bible tells the unfolding story of God's love that culminates in the restoration of his creation. As Peter says "a new heaven and a new earth." What if there comes a time when hell itself is cast into hell?

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  2. Is Hell Real?
    To find the TRUTH why hell was created; Read 2Peter chapter 2 verse 4.

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  3. Hell is NOT separation from God. I don't know where this false doctrine originated but it's not Biblical. As a matter of fact the Bible teaches the very opposite of separation from God. Rev 14:10; 2Thes 1:8-9 (KJV) make that very clear. Not to mention the fact that God is omnipresent. That would be against His very nature.

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  4. Thank you for your comment. Respectfully I would encourage you to reflect on a couple things. First the passages you cited. I believe the book of revelation is a theopolitical critique of the Roman Empire written in symbols not to be understood literally. However, if you interpret it literally you will note that the context is the fall of Babylon (Rome) and specifically singles out those who receive the mark of the beast. So if you're a literalist then you are faced with accounting for all those who died outside of the faith yet didn't receive the mark of the beast. The text doesn't address them. The other passage in 2 Thessalonians actually points out that the end of those who reject God's love is exclusion from his presence. In other words, God allows them to have what they inseisted on. Secondly, I think it is possible to read the Bible and find texts that represent God as a vengeful and violent warrior god. However, I think if you reflect on the full revelation of God in Jesus Christ it becomes clear that God is not like the gods of the Babylonian or Greek pantheons, that God is (and always has been) like Jesus. Thanks again for your comment.

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    3. While the book of Revelation may be a theopolitical critique of the Roman Empire it's also apocalyptic and prophetic in nature. Rev 14 may be specifically talking about those who receive the mark of the beast but more importantly it reveals to us what hell is like. "...tormented with fire and brimstone...in the presence of the Lamb." As mentioned before God is omnipresent, that's part of His nature, thus He will be there stoking the flames of hell. Also 2 These 8-9 in the KJV is consistent with Rev 14 in that those "Who shall be punished with everlasting destruction FROM THE PRESENCE OF THE LORD." Those who "know not God and that obey not the gospel" will receive their punishment from God/the Lamb/the Lord. I know modern translations say separated from the Lord but the majority of mss agree with the KJV. But that's another argument for another time. Psm 139: 7-8 says, "Whither shall I go from thy spirit? or Whither shall I flee from thy presence? If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: If I make my bed in HELL, BEHOLD, THOU ART THERE." Again the point is that God is omnipresent and when one goes to hell b/c they know not God and they reject Christ and the gospel they will not escape the presence of God and His punishment. They will not be in the presence of the love of God but they will be in the presence of His wrath. I don't wish that on anyone but that's what the Scriptures teach. I'm not sure where this doctrine of hell being separated from God originated but I do know that Billy Grham and pope John Paul propogated it and the church ran wit it. Over the years the church has watered down the doctrine of hell to make it more paletable to the masses. How else would you build mega-churches. Here is what we know about hell from the scriptures. Hell is a place of flaming fire (Rev 20:10, 14-15; 2Thes 1:8-9; Mk9:43-48; Jude 1:7; Lk 16:23-24; Matt 25:41,46). It's a place place of smothering smoke with no rest day nor night (Rev 14:11). It's a place of dismal darkness (Jd 1:13). It's a place of screaming and wailing (Matt 22:13). A place of everlasting chains (Jd 1:6). It's a place of flesh-eating worms (Isa 14:9-15, 66:24). We need to realize that an omnipotent and omnipresent God created hell for a reason. And if He's not there stoking the flames then He is neither omnipotent nor omnipresent. And He wouldn't be a just God either. And that's leading to another argument for another time as well. Just remember that hell is real, hell is hot and it last forever. And the punishment is from God in His presence.

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